The U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (“FDA”) approval of the commonly-used abortion medication, Mifepristone, has been curtailed following dueling federal court decisions in Texas and Washington. Just days after a Texas federal judge’s ruling suspended the FDA’s approval of the drug, the U.S. Department of Justice (the “DOJ”) asked the Fifth Circuit to grant an emergency or administrative stay of that decision. Although the Fifth Circuit did grant temporary, albeit limited, relief, the court maintained that Mifepristone could only be prescribed in the first seven weeks of pregnancy, under a physician’s supervision, and the drug cannot be sent by mail.Continue Reading Access to Abortion Pill in Limbo: Navigating the Intricacies of FDA Approval as well as Conflicting Federal Court Rulings

On March 24, 2023, FDA issued its draft guidance for industry regarding the use of “Dietary Guidance Statements” on food labeling. FDA defines “Dietary Guidance Statements” as voluntary labeling statements, images, or words used on food packaging that convey that the food item is part of, or contributes to, a “nutritious dietary pattern.” As noted by FDA, Dietary Guidance Statements provide manufacturers with an additional set of messages that can be used on-pack, beyond nutrient content claims or “healthy” claims. FDA has issued the guidance as part of its wider effort to create a healthier food supply for Americans and ensure consumers have more, and “better”, nutrition information about the foods they purchase.Continue Reading “Dietary Guidance Statements” in Food Labeling: What You Need to Know About FDA’s Latest Draft Guidance for the Food Industry

On March 29, 2023, and March 30, 2023, the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (“FDA”) issued a series of FAQs[1] and a guidance document[2] clarifying the agency’s intended implementation of the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2023 (the “Omnibus”), which amended Section 524B of the Food, Drug & Cosmetics Act (the “FD&C Act”) to require the demonstration of cybersecurity safeguards in pre-market submissions for certain medical devices.[3] Continue Reading FDA To Require Demonstration of Cybersecurity Safeguards for Pre-Market Submissions of Certain Medical Devices

On March 1, 2023, the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER) at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published its first untitled letter of the year to Thomas Advanced Medical LLC (Thomas)[1] for marketing human cells, tissues, or cellular or tissue-based products (HCT/Ps)[2] without FDA premarket review. The letter described Thomas’ marketing of products derived from human umbilical cord, umbilical cord blood and amniotic tissue as “regenerative therapy solutions” or “stem cell derived biological product” to treat various diseases and conditions including cardiac disease, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, lung disease, diabetes and COVID-19.Continue Reading FDA Issues First Untitled Letter of the Year to HCT/P Manufacturer

On January 31, 2023, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published a Warning Letter[1] to RightEye, LLC (RightEye), the manufacturer of the RightEye Vision System, for misbranding and adulteration. The RightEye Vision System is a Class II Nystagmograph medical device which is cleared under its 510(k) notification for the following indication: “recording, viewing, and analyzing eye movements in support of identifying visual tracking impairment in human subjects.”[2] Continue Reading FDA Issues Warning Letter to RightEye, LLC For Misbranding and Adulteration

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has extended the comment period for its proposed new “healthy” regulations for food packaging. The new deadline for comments is February 16, 2023. The 50-day extension follows requests from stakeholders to allow additional time for interested persons to submit comments to the proposed regulations. Continue Reading Comment Period for “Healthy” Regulations Extended; But Consumer Class Actions Targeting “Health Halos” May Continue

As we take a breather during the holiday whirlwind, we wanted to flag for readers a recent development in advertising and promotion regulation that FDA quietly released nearly a month ago. In a Memorandum issued on October 27 (the “Memorandum”), the Food and Drug Administration (“FDA” or the “Agency”) indicated that it will now permit certain COVID-19 drugs that have been granted Emergency Use Authorization (“EUA”) to make claims of safety and efficacy in print, advertising, and promotional materials, pursuant to certain limitations.Continue Reading FDA Lightens Promotional Restrictions for Certain COVID-19 Drugs with Emergency Use Authorization

FDA issued a proposed rule on September 28, 2022, to update the definition of “healthy” by specifying new criteria by which the term can be used in food labeling. As a result of the proposed changes, FDA expects more food in the marketplace will be able to make use of the “healthy” claim.Continue Reading FDA Proposes Updated Rule for “Healthy” Foods

The United States’ recent False Claims Act (“FCA”) prosecution in United States v. Prometheus Group, et al., is a reminder that the government will use the FCA to target medical device manufacturers for off-label use of medical devices, even where healthcare providers have decided the use is safe and effective. In Prometheus Group, the government alleges that the defendant medical device manufacturer trained providers to re-use disposable rectal probes against U.S. Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) recommendations, causing the providers to submit false claims for payment to Medicare for the services mis-using the probes. The complaint alleges that Prometheus put vulnerable Medicare patients at risk to gain a marketing advantage by reducing overhead costs associated with its systems. The message to medical device manufacturers is clear: even without submitting claims to the government themselves, manufacturers can face FCA liability for suggesting providers use their devices in any way the FDA has not approved (and in this case, warned against).Continue Reading The Government Seeks FCA Liability for Off-Label Use of Medical Devices